Offering Hope in Deprived Communities

This wonderful photo has already been widely admired by so many of our Facebook friends, and depicts a typical day at the office for Jan Sander. The image was captured just moments before Jan discovered that the dog’s collar was embedded in the dog’s neck.

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Photo by Arthur

Without the work that Cluny Animal Trust does in indigent communities, and indeed without the work of other similar animal welfares, these types of horrors would be left undetected and untreated.

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Photo by Arthur

The dog underwent surgery and the embedded collar was removed. After his treatment he was returned to his owners. Jan provided a proper collar for the dog and gave instruction to the owners about appropriate care.

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Photo by Arthur

Although the dog had been on a chain and running wire, which is deemed illegal in many instances, Jan reported that the dog had been well cared for in other respects, and had access to food, water and shelter.

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Photo by EM Walker

This week Jan has run an education clinic on the subject of the chain and running wire. While Cluny Animal Trust does not promote the use of chain and running wire, it is in reality a much used method for restraint of dogs by many owners. Cluny therefore hopes to educate those who continue to use this method about its dangers and how to minimize any discomfort and risk to the dog.

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Photos by EM Walker

It is often true that poverty and ignorance go hand in hand. It is Cluny’s Mission that neither poverty nor ignorance should prohibit the delivery of care to animals in need.

It is Dr Katherine Barker’s belief that it is only through access to care, and through the witnessing of the results of right care, that the beginnings of change can be seeded in communities too deprived to know better. She believes that hearts remain hardened when there is little hope and no alternative to the all too conspicuous suffering of animals in and around deprived areas.

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Photo by EM Walker

Cluny’s offer of affordable pet care presents this hope in deprived communities.  Jan Sander encourages children to gather at his weekly clinics in Mashaeng (Fouriesburg), Kgubetswana (Clarens) and Bohlokong (Bethlehem) where he is able to informally educate whilst at the same time administer preventive measures against parasites and other conditions to the pets brought to the clinic. He believes that the changes in appropriate pet care that we strive to achieve in our indigent communities will undoubtedly start with the children.

Text by EM Walker 7/10/16

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